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Calling the Salmon Home

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Calling the Salmon Home

The Spokane Riverkeeper attended the canoe landing and Salmon Ceremony on the Columbia River at Kettle Falls. Before the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam, Kettle Falls served as a sacred gathering spot for tribes and First Nations peoples during salmon runs. The Ceremony of Tears in 1940 was the last Salmon Ceremony held before Kettle Falls was permanently inundated with water and the salmon runs blocked - until 2016 when these canoes were built by tribes of the Upper Columbia River Basin and the journey to Kettle Falls and tradition of the Salmon Ceremony revived.

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Riverkeeper Blog

Here is our most recent Justice Lunchbox featuring Jerry White, Spokane Riverkeeper discussing the work he and Jule Schultz do regarding nonpoint source pollution on Hangman Creek and other Spokane River tributaries.

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Riverkeeper: Standing with Mosier, OR - Testimony Supporting Halt to Oil Train Traffic

Spokane City Council takes the Courageous Stand to Call for Stop to Oil Train Traffic over our Spokane River and through Spokane, WA  

Jerry at City CounselThis past Monday, Jerry White, our Spokane Riverkeeper, gave testimony at the Spokane City Council meeting regarding a resolution (2016-0056) in response to the recent oil train derailment and fire in Mosier, Oregon. The resolution was passed and can be read in full below. Last Friday, 16 cars from a 96-car train transporting highly flammable Bakken crude oil derailed in the Columbia River Gorge city of Mosier, Oregon. Four of the cars then caught fire sending massive amounts of smoke into the air. About a quarter of Mosier residents were evacuated, as well as 100 students from the local school that stands only 200 feet from the site of the flaming oil. Union Pacific Railroad and the city of Mosier agree that the damage from the crash could have been even more catastrophic if the wind speed had been at the usual 25 mile per hour rate that afternoon.

Jerry began his testimony by explaining that the Union Pacific Railroad has “pushed aside the derailed oil tanker cars and begun running train traffic while the burnt cars continue to smolder.” Voicing his grave concern for this reckless and unacceptable behavior, he continued to explain that the evacuated families had not yet returned home and measures had not yet been taken to clean up the spill when Union Pacific made this decision. In conclusion Jerry made clear that “the Spokane Riverkeeper stands with the city of Mosier and their Columbia River, and supports their request for a temporary halt in train traffic.” As a community voice for the river, Jerry and all of us here at the Center for Justice support this resolution and find it to be a reasonable short term response to an industry that appears to be out of control and out of touch with the norms of corporate and community responsibility.

In the end, the Spokane City Council, under the leadership of City Council President Ben Stuckart, took a courageous stance and passed Resolution 2016-0056, calling for the halt to oil train traffic through our city and over our river.  We thank them for their leadership and vision in the face of this issue.

Read Jerry’s full testimony below:

"It has come to our attention that in Mosier, Oregon the Union Pacific Railroad has now pushed has aside the derailed oil tanker cars and begun running train traffic while the burnt cars still smoulder. This is happening before many evacuated families have even returned to their homes. We know that oil reached the river, leaving state officials to initiate clean-up efforts. This reeks of a “business as usual” ethos on the part of Union Pacific that is absolutely unacceptable. This is particularly outrageous in light of the fact that we do yet understand the nature of the derailment. The Spokane Riverkeeper stands with the city Mosier and their Columbia River, and supports their request for a temporary halt in train traffic. Under 49 U.S.C. 5121(d), the United States Department of Transportation has the authority to declare an emergency prohibition of future oil train shipments through Mosier until it is proven to be safe for renewed rail traffic. We understand that Oregon’s Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, Governor Kate Brown and Representatives Earl Blumenauer and Suzanne Bonamici released the following statement today calling for a temporary halt to oil train traffic in Columbia River Gorge Saying that, and I Quote, “They (the people of Mosier, Oregon) deserve to know that the causes of this derailment have been both identified and fixed, and there should be a moratorium on oil train traffic until they get those explanations and assurances” This terrifying incident is a mere warning of the catastrophic risks that huge segments of our community have been demanding action on for months. In light of proposed oil by rail facilities on Washington’s West side, Spokane will continue to bare the risk of oil fires in our river, spills in our community, in our river and over our drinking water. We bare the risk while the Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroads reap the profits of this traffic. This is in, and of itself, is outrageous. As a community voice for the river, I absolutely support this resolution which is a sane and reasonable short term response to an industry that appears to be out of control and out of touch with the norms of corporate and community responsibility."

Find the full resolution by City Council in the link below:

OilTrainsResFinal

For additional information on the train derailment, check out these links:

CNN

Climate Progress

ABC News

Oregon Live

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Spokane Riverkeeper Announces “River Partners”

Spokane Riverkeeper is dedicated to protecting and restoring the health of the Spokane River Watershed. The Spokane Riverkeeper River Partners Program celebrates the value added to our community and economy by the Spokane River. Quality of life and the health of the economy and local businesses are related to the health of the environment. The River Partners Program provides an opportunity for businesses to become involved with the Riverkeeper program and increases the community awareness of the integral role of the Spokane River to our city. The program helps broaden and diversify the support base for Spokane Riverkeeper and creates an attitude of community stewardship towards the Spokane River. Businesses who join the Spokane Riverkeeper River Partners Program sign a pledge agreeing to the following statements:

  • A healthy, swimmable and fishable Spokane River is good for our local community and our economic environment.
  • Accessing and recreating on the river is an important part of the cultural and economic life of our community.
  • Respecting other river users and holding professional standards with respect to health and safety of those who live, play and work on the river is a priority.
  • Adopting water friendly business practices is an essential part of conducting business.
  • We are committed to keeping out river clean and safe, respecting the contributions a healthy river makes to our community.
  • We will connect the customers we serve with the health and beauty of our river and conduct business in a manner that demonstrates respect for the Spokane River.

In addition to signing this pledge, program members are connected with other Riverkeeper partners and receive media exposure for their businesses at Riverkeeper events as well as regular Riverkeeper updates.

Spokane businesses who are among the first to participate in the program include Numerica Credit Union, Silver Bow Fly Shop, FLOW Adventures, Kizuri, Ammonite Ink, and River City Brewing. Members have the opportunity to engage with the Riverkeeper program in four different areas:

  1. Financial Engagement (the giving of monetary resources)
  2. Policy/Program Support (includes attending meetings and signing on to letters)
  3. River Healthy Practices (adopting policies that favor the Spokane River)
  4. Volunteer/Time (participating in Riverkeeper events including the river clean-up)

The wellbeing of the environment is directly linked to wellbeing of the economy and the community in general. Jake Krummel, the Downtown Market Manager for Spokane Numerica Credit Union, stated that “The health of our local watersheds has a direct impact on the health of our community and our local environment. The advocacy and education efforts of the Spokane Riverkeeper showcase the importance of keeping our river clean, and are something Numerica is proud to support.” Participating in the Riverkeeper River Partners Program is an excellent way to protect the Spokane River, grow a business and contribute to increasing the quality of life in the Spokane community. To become a partner, please contact Jerry White at (509) 835-5211 or Jerry@CforJustice.org.

Find out more about River Partners here.

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Polluting Waterways Without Penalty. Native Trout Cannot Live in Mud!

streamBy Jule Shultz, Riverkeeper Technical Lead

A few months ago, while scouting locations for water quality sampling sites, we came across this shallow stream that was recently dredged by a landowner. The ditch, excavated for the purpose of draining agricultural land, flows directly into Hangman Creek bringing with it: • High water flows unfiltered by streamside vegetation • Tons of sediment • Fertilizer • Fecal Coliform (from feces and manure) • And other nasties!

Hangman Creek has been documented as one of the most polluted waterways in Washington State

(WRIA, 2005; Stream Report, 2005).

But why should you care about the health

of Hangman Creek?

  1. Do you like swimming or recreating in the Creek or Spokane River? High levels of fecal coliform in Hangman Creek pose a health hazard to those who come into contact with it. Improving waste water treatment plants and implementing proper animal management practices are key to cleaning the creek.
  2. Do you enjoy fly fishing for native trout? High temperatures in Hangman Creek kill native redband trout and impede their reintroduction. Soil erosion destroys spawning beds and kills the insects that trout need to eat. Streamside shorelines vegetated with trees and shrubs that create a canopy lower water temperatures and provide habitat for insects that trout need to survive.
  3. Do you love the rolling farmland of the Palouse? Poor farmland management washes tons of that dirt, and the associated nutrients, into Hangman Creek every year. This sediment and nutrients fuel toxic algae blooms in Long Lake, creating health warnings and unsightly algal mats. “Direct seed” methods of agriculture could reduce agricultural runoff dramatically.

We sent this photo and others to local regulatory agencies, thinking that surely this must be illegal. Although I’m not a lawyer, I felt there must be some law broken when a stream can just be dredged and straightened. As it turns out, these actions are perfectly legal based on a number of agricultural exemptions to the Clean Water Act

 

As someone who cares about the health of the Spokane River, and who diligently monitors pollution on this stream, this allowable exemption which results in severe pollution in our watersheds is beyond frustrating. Given the lack of regulation on agricultural lands how does one clean up these sources of pollution? Some programs are being implemented, for instance in the Chesapeake Bay and the Great Lakes. However, in many cases these programs rely heavily on incentives, such as through grants and loans for proper pasture management. Relying solely on incentives, without a regulatory backstop, allows bad actors to continue polluting without any penalty.

Locally a number of organizations are working towards cleaning up Hangman Creek. Riparian plantings, land and easement purchases, and implementation of conservation practices all work towards the goal of clean water in Hangman Creek. However, I think the problem is so big in this watershed none of these practices alone will solve it.

So what is the solution? The answer to that will be complex. It will involve providing incentives to implement best management practices, regulation of existing water quality law and education about the value of intact riparian buffers. The Spokane Riverkeeper will be working in the Hangman watershed for years to come. We will be exploring pollution solutions through monitoring water quality, pressing for the enforcement of existing regulations, educating the public and advocating for a swimmable and fishable river.

Despite the legality of the pollution shown above, there are many ways to make a difference on Hangman Creek. Reporting pollution as it is happening, volunteering with one of the many organizations, such as the Spokane Riverkeeper, and supporting your local environmental group all go a long way towards restoring Hangman Creek.

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