Spokane’s signature fish, the wild Redband trout, deserves to be saved, defended, and protected.   

photo Mike Visintainer

photo Mike Visintainer

photo Sean Zenishek

photo Sean Zenishek

photo T. Ghezzi

photo T. Ghezzi

Redband trout, Spokane's fish

The wild native Redband trout has lived in the streams and rivers of this region for thousands of years. Feeding countless generations of inhabitants of the Spokane and surrounding areas. The Redband is our iconic native fish, threatened by habitat degradation. The community of Spokane is in control of its future. The Redband population has been severely reduced due to habitat destruction, warm water temperatures and the negative effects of sediment loading on riverbeds. 

 

Fish Facts

 Redband Trout commonly grow larger than 10 inches.  photo Sean Zenishek

 Redband Trout commonly grow larger than 10 inches.  photo Sean Zenishek

•    Spokane’s iconic Redband is a subspecies of the rainbow trout. 

•    The United States Fish and Wildlife Service records the Redband trout as a species of concern. 

•    The Redband trout is visually distinct with its rosy to brick red coloring (or band) running the length of its body, from its gills to tail. 

•    Distinct white tips on the anal, dorsal, and pectoral fins

•    The Redband has darker and larger rounded spots than a rainbow trout and keeps these beautiful, freckle like dark marks through adulthood. 

•    Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) consider the Redband trout to be a sentinel species and a barometer of aquatic health.

•   The Redband inhabit the cool clean waters of the Spokane River watershed

 

 

poor water quality Threatens redband health and Survival


Removal of shoreline forests cause high water temperatures, sediment, and "flashy flows", all of which harm native Redband Trout. 

no riparian buffer muddy creek.jpg

 

this fish needs our help

The Redband inhabit the cool clean waters of the Spokane River ecosystem. The Spokane River and its tributaries are prime spawning habitats for trout. The Redband trout are not stocked and naturally reproduce. Redbands need gravel riverbeds free of silt for successful spawning. This silt carries nasty nutrients like phosphorus that promote algae growth and deplete oxygen that fish need to breath.

Flooding in winter of 2016-17 on Hangman Creek transported tons of sediment and covered substrate in the Spokane River that fish and insects depend on for spawning and habitat.  Photos Cutboard Studios

Flooding in winter of 2016-17 on Hangman Creek transported tons of sediment and covered substrate in the Spokane River that fish and insects depend on for spawning and habitat.  Photos Cutboard Studios

 

Shoreline forests and vegetation help keep our River clean and provide essential habitat for trout. 

Protecting, restoring, and maintaining suitable habitat for trout is the goal in saving our native Redband Trout. Our focus is on the protection of Spokane River and it's tributaries. We must restore, improve, and protect shoreline habitat (stream-side vegetation). Shoreline forestation and vegetation are essential in keeping the river clean, the water temperatures cool and decreases the effect of negative sediment loading. (insert Link)

 

Creating objectives for the conservation of the Redband and implementing these practices we achieve our goals of saving, defending, and protecting Spokane's iconic fish.  

 

The Redband Trout is your fish, help Keep the Spokane River Wild and restore the native Redbands