How Your Riverkeeper Keeps Track of Temperatures in Hangman Creek

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How Your Riverkeeper Keeps Track of Temperatures in Hangman Creek

For the fifth consecutive year, Spokane Riverkeeper staff installed temperature data loggers in Hangman Creek, from just below the headwaters to its confluence with the Spokane River near Peaceful Valley.

We study temperature in Hangman Creek to document the effects of climate change on water temperatures, and so we can share water quality violations with the public and the regulators. Temperature in Hangman and in the Spokane River is a huge concern. Native fish thrive only under 64.4 degrees F.

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Kids, Beavers, and Hangman Creek

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Kids, Beavers, and Hangman Creek

What does a bunch of kids running up a wheat field in the Palouse have to do with beavers and Hangman Creek? Here’s what.

We offered up the opportunity to teach a bunch of 9th graders at Pride Prep about why beavers are essential to restoring the headwaters of Hangman Creek, and they jumped at the chance. 

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2018 Summer Hangman Creek Water Temperature

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2018 Summer Hangman Creek Water Temperature

The Spokane Riverkeeper collected water temperature data from the Hangman Creek watershed in 2018.  All locations exceeded the state water quality standard of 64.4 F (18 C).  Unlike previous years’ data, water temperature in the tributaries were similar to that of the main stem.  In addition, water temperatures were lower in the main stem than in previous years.  This may be due to the higher water table than in previous years that feeds Hangman Creek and results in higher flows.  We compared temperatures in Hangman Creek with daily temperature records, flows, and aquifer height. 

 

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Midnite Mine Update and White Paper

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Midnite Mine Update and White Paper

The Midnite Mine is a closed uranium mine on the Spokane Indian Reservation, west of Wellpinit, WA. The company responsible for cleaning up the mine has requested that the EPA accept a substantially less stringent cleanup level to address contaminated surface materials at the Site.

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Water Quality Standards: Why your River is Not Unlike a Pumpkin Pie.

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Water Quality Standards: Why your River is Not Unlike a Pumpkin Pie.

Under the Clean Water Act, all of the waters of the United States have Water Quality Standards (WQS) to protect them from pollution.  These are standards that are designed as the amount of pollutant allowed in a water body.  The Water Quality Standard guarantees the health, the safety, and usability by people and wildlife.  These standards ensure that all of our waters are fishable and swimmable.  In some cases this also includes drinkable.  These WQS are the bedrock of river and water protection in our society.

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Fall 2018 eNews

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Fall 2018 eNews

Check out the Spokane Riverkeeper 2018 Fall eNews. Our newsletter contains all the information you need to know to keep up to date about our work protecting the Spokane River.

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Wastewater Microplastics Pollution in the Surface Water of the Spokane River

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Wastewater Microplastics Pollution in the Surface Water of the Spokane River

Anthropogenic microplastic pollution is a growing threat in freshwater ecosystems around the world. This has been a long-known threat in the Spokane river watershed with numerous responses undertaken to combat the problems of pollutants. One of the targets has been wastewater effluent, a known point source for pollutants. There is a new emerging anthropogenic pollutant, microplastic, which is being discovered to be pervasive throughout the globe. This study aimed to find if the Spokane Wastewater Treatment plant (WWTP) was a point source for microplastic pollution.

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2018 Spokane River Water Temperature

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2018 Spokane River Water Temperature

The Spokane Riverkeeper monitored water temperature in the Spokane River in summer of 2018. Water temperature in the Spokane River showed the usual pattern of high temperatures approaching a daily maxima of 80 degrees or more in the losing reach at Barker Road and Harvard Road.  The gaining reach continued to show lower water temperatures, under that state standard for interior redband trout of 64.4 F.  Water temperature in the gaining reach continued to show decreased water temperature with decreasing flows in the Spokane River.  Water temperatures in the Spokane River’s losing reach appear to be rising when compared to 2001 and 2002 data. 

 

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Effect of Sediment Pollution from Hangman Creek on the Spokane River

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Effect of Sediment Pollution from Hangman Creek on the Spokane River

The Spokane Riverkeeper partnered with Spokane Falls Trout Unlimited and other citizen scientists to monitor the effect of sediment discharging from Hangman Creek on the water clarity in the Spokane River. Monitoring throughout the winter and spring showed reduced water clarity in the Spokane River due to Hangman Creek 30-80% of the time.

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2017 Water Quality Report Card

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2017 Water Quality Report Card

The results are in for 2017 and once again we find that Hangman Creek harbors conditions that fail to support our native redband trout, much less the salmon that once swam in it's waters. 

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2017 Phosphorous Study

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2017 Phosphorous Study

We partnered with EWU to look at phosphorous loads in Hangman Creek during the spring of 2017.  The amount of phosphorous in our waters is extremely important to primary production in our surface waters, causing algal blooms and (indirectly) low dissolved oxygen in Lake Spokane.  Phosphorous is locally regulated in surface water discharges due to it's effect on Lake Spokane,

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Calling the Salmon Home

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Calling the Salmon Home

The Spokane Riverkeeper attended the canoe landing and Salmon Ceremony on the Columbia River at Kettle Falls. Before the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam, Kettle Falls served as a sacred gathering spot for tribes and First Nations peoples during salmon runs. The Ceremony of Tears in 1940 was the last Salmon Ceremony held before Kettle Falls was permanently inundated with water and the salmon runs blocked - until 2016 when these canoes were built by tribes of the Upper Columbia River Basin and the journey to Kettle Falls and tradition of the Salmon Ceremony revived.

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Join us!  Free tour of Bunker Hill Superfund Site, June 8

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Join us! Free tour of Bunker Hill Superfund Site, June 8

The Spokane Riverkeeper, along with staff from the EPA and the Idaho Panhandle Health Department will lead a free tour of the Bunker Hill Superfund Site on June 8th. Although downtown Spokane is many miles away from the Bunker Hill Mine, mining operations that began in the 1880s continue to impact the health of downstream waterways from the South Fork Coeur d’Alene River all the way to the Spokane River.

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Spring 2018 Newsletter

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Spring 2018 Newsletter

Paul Lindholdt's newest book, The Spokane River pulls together a diverse array of experts and enthusiasts to expound about the River, including past and present Spokane Riverkeepers, Rick Eichstaedt, Bart Mihailovich, and Jerry White, Jr.

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Celebrating Hangman Creek

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Celebrating Hangman Creek

Canoes are tippy.  After a brief safety talk and paddle demo (provided by yours truly), Uncle Jerry White (your Riverkeeper) treated us to a devotional sermon, and we were off.

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